Product Design / General

User Interviews

User Interviews

Product Design / General · August 28, 2017 at 2:12pm
Hey guys! I’m a product designer at Managed by Q and am trying to learn what is the best way to approach interviewing users as a designer. Our product team conducts at least 4 - 5 user interviews every week. We are using interviews to test future designs with InVision prototypes, validate new features, and obtain feedback about the product. I'm new to conducting and interviewing users, and I’m curious to know how other product teams approach user interviews. Some of the things I'd love to learn more about include:
  • Does your team conduct user interviews? If so how frequently and for what purpose?
  • What are some of the tools you use to conduct and document user feedback?
  • What are some of the design tools you use to present and test designs?
  • Who leads the interviews and what is your role (as a designer) in the interview?
  • What do you do to prepare for the interviews?
Also wondering what books, talks, or resources out there have been helpful.
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August 29, 2017 at 1:05am
Awesome thanks for sharing @matthew, @mitch, and @effy!
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Definitely need to work on entering user interviews with clear goal in mind and having a document/script has helped a lot. Have also learned that interviewing users is not something natural for me, so I need to continue practicing—for some reason the fact that it's an interview makes the conversation feel different haha, especially when over the phone as I can't see the person I'm talking with.
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I started reading Eriks Halls' 'Just Enough Research', and will take a look at the books you mentioned @effy
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I started with just go meet the user. There is a coffee shop in mission, SF, I just go there buy a coffee every week and chat with the owner for 20-30 mins, and I learnt a lot.
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I mean, the coffee shop use the product i designed
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August 29, 2017 at 4:10am
Depending on the product and the stage you are at you might want/can test your design/prototype/product less or more frequently and in different ways. Usually I've tried to have people looking at some of our design work every 2 weeks (you can't really do more often if you really work on the outcomes of your research, unless you have multiple research teams).
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You
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You can find a lot of insight from Tomer Sharon (ex Google and now Head UX at WeWork https://medium.com/@tsharon). Since he joined WeWork he spent a lot of time in improving their design/research cycle and shared a lot of what they've done and how. They also built a tool to collect research design outcome pills to share across the company.
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The most important thing in the whole ux research is having clear goals, don't skew the users and let them speak, and actually take actions on the outcome, which usually is the thing the most companies get wrong.
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Tools to test design you can really decide what you like depending on what you're testing. I've used anything like sketch on paper, Axure prototypes (Invision/Marvel is quite limiting when working on a solid prototype) or real HTML/JS. But you can also find values in tools like Verify, optimal workshop and Usabilla
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Verify is now deprecated and has been replaced by https://zurb.com/helio/ (haven't used it yet)
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For the interview itself you need to have a script and try to stick to your wording as much as possible. Depending on the type of test tho, you might want to give less or more freedome to users and let them explore, in that case you might be able to observe and come up with relevant and not leading questions on the spot.
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August 29, 2017 at 1:34pm
Does your team conduct user interviews? If so how frequently and for what purpose?
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When we conduct the interviews depends on the project but ideally we would like to gather qualitative data from interviews to inform the product decisions we make before starting a new product or feature.
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We also conduct interviews and supervised tests at various points in our product development workflow to try and validate our goals before certain release points of the product.
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What are some of the tools you use to conduct and document user feedback?
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Zoom for communication when the interview is conducted remotely. Zoom is great because it has the ability to record the meeting.
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Google Slides to help facilitate the interview if you need to show specific examples of things or concepts
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If you are conducting a remote interview or test that involves a beta or unreleased build of a mobile application I would suggest utilizing Lookback to observe behavior in the app.
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What do you do to prepare for the interviews?
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We start by defining goals for the interviews. It’s important to know what type of data you want to collect and what the means to the product/project. These goals will inform the questions you ask.
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We create a protocol for all of our interviews and tests. This ensures that we cover everything we need cover during the interview and also serves as a stepped checklist for the interview. Include your questions and tasks (if testing) in the protocol.
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We also practice the interview protocol several times internally so we feel comfortable conducting it and then we make any adjustments needed based on the practice.
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I hope this is useful and I didn’t blow up this thread too much 😬
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August 29, 2017 at 8:42pm
Totally agree that having a plan to start is important. I'm curious though, how do you phrase your learning objectives?
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