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Team

Sketching Interfaces

October 26, 2017 at 4:29pm

Sketching Interfaces

October 26, 2017 at 4:29pm (Edited 3 years ago)
Hey all,
I'm completely blown away by the response to this blog post, it's been an amazing outpouring of excitement and some thoughtful critique.
I think that we're all realizing that AI assisted design is coming, and maybe a little faster than we anticipated.
Personally, I'm excited about the potential for AI to strip away some of the tedious tasks associated with product design and development, but I'd love to hear what everyone else thinks.
Ideas? Questions? Concerns? AMA.
Ben

October 26, 2017 at 4:32pm
This blew my mind but makes so much sense. If you have a shared component library why would you _not_ want to be able to draw your interfaces?!
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Right!? I think that once you have symbols that are easily resprented as drawings or words or whatever, you can choose your own medium for composing interfaces... for me, I just happen to like drawing 😬
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Loved this post Ben, thanks for sharing here! Just a small thing - I think the embed option is a bit weird. If you just edit this thread and the paste the link the post, it might work better and should generate a nice link preview for people 😙
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All set. I'm a Spectrum rookie.
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Nah, that's on us for having a confusing embed flow :P
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no link preview :(
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Where do i sign up? I would use this on the daily to test ideas and prototype.
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The earliest version used machine learning for artists' DoodleClassifier: http://ml4a.github.io/ which you can setup and play around with if you have a little bit of xcode knowledge.
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The production-ready and open source version of this is a little further out :)
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So rad! I could see thing being incredibly helpful trying to communicate different ideas. For example, during design crit I often have to sketch out a different variations to communicate stronger hierarchy. This would be pretty cool to see in that setting.
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Really interesting! Thanks to you and your team for sharing these ideas.
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How do you pass data to the sketched components? For example, setting the label text for each button in a button group, or choosing specific icons, or designing copy for an alert message etc?
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Good question—for handdrawn components, we have to rely on default properties. In this demo, our model focuses on interpreting the sketch as a symbol, but I can imagine a future where similar functionality is integrated into a more full featured product development environment.
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October 27, 2017 at 5:07am
As already tweeted, blown away the path you opened up with the thing you’ve built!
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Had the same thoughts as Tom. With that superpowers building just another tool that encourages designer bias would be like giving a Marvel Weapon to an ***hole 😰.
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I know those designers exist (as do too). With that I eould like to be able to test ideas out with real people (non-designers or devs, the 95% that are not super-power-users with makers bias). And with dynamic content: Examples would be 1. Static with real content; 2. (Faceted) search; 3. Any user generated content. Being able to quickly test these ideas A. to gather evidence if the idea work or B. go back to the drawing board (not just to confirm one‘s own bias) would inceadibly powerful
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October 28, 2017 at 11:23am
Interested to see how this evolves. Btw here’s an impressive demo of a design tool from >20 years ago https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VLQcW6SpJ88
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October 28, 2017 at 5:50pm
Yes! Our team has been in touch with James Landay, hoping to get his thoughts on the work we‘re doing
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October 30, 2017 at 9:31am
Hmm… James Landay's visionary point of view seems to be motivated by the (ever re-circulated) idea of skipping the developer when it comes to design decisions impacting the ux.
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I actually love – and believe in – designers working closely together with engineers to come up with the best possible solution after a problem has been well defined. In my designers (in tech) often times have an oversimplified mental model of a possible UI and are less capable to think through presumed edge cases — leading to a pretty but half assed UX.
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To me the power and impact of this could have today is more close to sth like, let's say, markdown. A tool that helps anyone becoming a better designer by making the creation of interactions and flow faster and more tangible. By making this process easier and faster improving learning pace.
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However creation of entirely new user interfaces — this ever chased unicorn — is a very different task from optimising mainly efficiency by allowing the Single Source of Truth to move from design artifact to code and back
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I'm not sure there's a ton of value in the "creation of entirely new user interfaces"–though I appreciate that it's usually the common goal.
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The thing is, there haven't been that many radically different UIs since the dawn of HTML. Sure, there have been some people pushing boundaries but the vast majority of apps and websites are using the same avatars, dropdowns, text, inputs and buttons.
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A lot of what makes these same components look different is poor implementation. If we were to remove all the objective mistakes from web development, components would start to look more and more similar across the web.
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