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Haven't even gotten a single interview yet. What am I doing wrong?

October 24, 2017 at 11:05pm

Haven't even gotten a single interview yet. What am I doing wrong?

October 24, 2017 at 11:05pm (Edited 2 years ago)
I 've been on the job market for a couple of weeks now, and have been applying left and right, but still haven't gotten a single interview (apart from one a recruiter set up, but told them I'm a fullstack developer, which I'm not).
Anything I could improve to get callbacks?
Edit: Thanks for your valuable feedback! Redid my resume to have more clear messaging: https://www.dropbox.com/s/55xlzhq0tq63bn8/Adam-Rasheed-CV-Dev-2017.pdf?dl=0

October 24, 2017 at 11:17pm
first up: why is there a second page with no content?
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My initial reaction is that it's very overwhelming with information. A lot of words, especially with the double column layout makes me quickly glaze over. Just my take though.
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First thing I tell junior people when they send a résumé for feedback is to scrap the "skills" section
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tbh, it gives an impression that you're more junior than you likely are.
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Work history is the most important section
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and website/email should be right under your name
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at the very top
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Education should come right after work history
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There is some good advice above.
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I have been interviewing at a bunch of places the last couple of weeks, so can offer some feedback that I've been hearing and applying myself...
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👆 I definitley agree with this. If you want to include some of those "skills" buzzwords sneak them in to your work description.
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Your CV gives me the impression that you're a front-end developer with design experience, rather than a "design generalist who can code" because typically designers don't do data analaysis with Excel or R. Perhaps you can rephrase that section to describe your skills as "Qualitative & Quantitative research & analysis with Excel and R" as that gives me a better understanding of where you could apply that in the role of a Designer.
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Your website is, good, but that also confused me a bit. The work, copy, and case studies give me the impression that you do Marketing and Web Design/Development, not necessarily Product Design.
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I guess I should take a step back and ask, what positions are you applying for? My overall advice is that you should try to focus your story and narrative (via your showcase of work) to be more "complete" for the type of role you want. If you're looking for a front-end developer role, you might want to include links to Github projects and sample code. Right now I get the impression of a "one man studio" which could be why you're not getting interview requests.
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My experience so far: Portfolio is the epicenter of almost every interview process I've had so far. They don't want to see a million odd projects, but a handful that demonstrate your process and work quality. They prefer a streamline narrative in the form of high quality/resolution screenshots, ideally prototypes and shipped products, along with some notes of your process, role, and design decisions and justifications.
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definitely agree. pointing people to a portfolio would probably be quite helpful.
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The way the type is set in the work section, it's very dense and the hierarchy is very low-contrast. Might want to add a little more space and make sure your type elements are more distinguishable
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the space in the middle is also *very* tight.
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between the two columns
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to Narek's point, I also didn't see any product UX work - appeared to be focused on small marketing site projects
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I really think you should consider switching the focus of your website from "one man studio" to "hey my name is Adam, I'm a recent grad, and I'm looking for an intership".
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Yeah, the site content is about you, but it's called creatix? "one-man studio" might seem like a good way to brand yourself, but it takes value away from your name too. Getting hired is a lot about name recognition, so use your real name as much as possible
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I recommend removing the "learning" bit from your resume. Resume's should focus on what you've done in the past and what you're capable of now.
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Also I know it's tough. I've been there as well, I know you put in a lot of hours to learn how to design and build things, but you have to stop counting your "years of experience". All that matters is the work. You're a recent grad with a couple of freelance projects, embrace that identity.
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