Stark / General

What are the best examples of accessibility in public places/spaces?

What are the best examples of accessibility in public places/spaces?

Stark/General · September 20, 2018 at 3:20am

What are the best examples of accessibility in public places/spaces?

Stark / General · September 20, 2018 at 3:20am (Edited 6 months ago)

List the example and where you found it. Bonus points for pics!


September 20, 2018 at 3:20am

I was pleasantly surprised when I saw majority of the stairs throughout the city of Stockholm had a portion of each staircase designed for individuals that use wheelchairs as (one of) their form(s) of mobility.

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September 21, 2018 at 9:55am

There has been a lot of thought put into pedestrian crossings, although you'll not find all these solutions everywhere;

1. When it isn't safe to cross, there will be a visual indicator (red light)

2. There are textured tiles guiding a pedestrian who doesn't rely on his/her vision to a high contrast pole with a button, and will indicate where the curb is. More and more these poles will give visual feedback that the button has been pushed.

3. When it is safe to cross, the light will turn red, and an auditory signal will go off for the duration of the safe window. (Funnily enough, I have found out there is a hidden button on some of these poles, that actually vibrates when the light changes, I assume for people who have problems with both vision and hearing?). The curb will slope down to the road, so that people with walkers or in wheelchairs can cross easily.

4. On the other side, the same textured tiles will indicate that the curb starts again.

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September 21, 2018 at 11:45pm

There has been a lot of thought put into pedestrian crossings, although you'll not find all these solutions everywhere;

1. When it isn't safe to cross, there will be a visual indicator (red light)

2. There are textured tiles guiding a pedestrian who doesn't rely on his/her vision to a high contrast pole with a button, and will indicate where the curb is. More and more these poles will give visual feedback that the button has been pushed.

3. When it is safe to cross, the light will turn red, and an auditory signal will go off for the duration of the safe window. (Funnily enough, I have found out there is a hidden button on some of these poles, that actually vibrates when the light changes, I assume for people who have problems with both vision and hearing?). The curb will slope down to the road, so that people with walkers or in wheelchairs can cross easily.

4. On the other side, the same textured tiles will indicate that the curb starts again.

Great examples! I've wanted to speak with someone who uses that to determine whether or not those truly provide the best solution possible for them. Civic / City design is amazing and I imagine a major design challenge.

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September 24, 2018 at 6:59am

My girlfriend is actually an Urban Designer, so she points out stuff like this all the time when we walk through the city.

There are a lot of laws and regulations which need to ensure accessibility. The problem often is that these rules and regulations are governed on multiple levels (in the US; national, state, municipality, etc.). But it's interesting and very welcome, since everyone should be able to use the *public* space.

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September 24, 2018 at 12:21pm

My girlfriend is actually an Urban Designer, so she points out stuff like this all the time when we walk through the city.

There are a lot of laws and regulations which need to ensure accessibility. The problem often is that these rules and regulations are governed on multiple levels (in the US; national, state, municipality, etc.). But it's interesting and very welcome, since everyone should be able to use the *public* space.

100% agreed!

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