menu

UXPin

Design, prototyping and design systems solution chosen by the best teams.

Channels
# All channels
view-forward
# General
view-forward
# Announcements
view-forward
# Feature requests
view-forward
# Help
view-forward
# Before you post
view-forward
# Learn
view-forward
Team

Adobe just released an update for XD with a bunch of 'new' features

November 8, 2019 at 9:13am
The UXPin community has a new home. This thread is preserved for historical purposes. The content of this conversation may be innaccurrate or out of date. Go to new community home →

Adobe just released an update for XD with a bunch of 'new' features

November 8, 2019 at 9:13am
Do you think Adobe has flat-out copied UXPin in it's latest update? Maybe I'm wrong and it's just the natural order of design tools but it seems lazy and contrived that Adobe's lounging around on a huge mound of riches sipping margaritas built by faithful users whose feature requests are actively ignored, and then suddenly when some competition comes around and LISTENS to its users and strives to improve its software, Adobe pays attention. What do you think?

November 9, 2019 at 5:18pm
That has been Adobe's way from the beginning. Virtually every product they have they bought or copied. I've been a designer for over 25 years, UXPin is by far the best design tool I have ever used. Using UXpin is like having Christmas every other week. Some new cool feature/improvement/enhancement. Almost every time, I think wow, that's really cool. Keep up the great work UXpin!!
like-fill
7
  • reply
  • like

November 12, 2019 at 4:36pm
If a feature is a great idea and users love it, a company would be dumb to ignore it. For example, UXPin is supposedly adding artboards down the line. Artboards are integral to XD. UXPin being lazy and contrived now? No, it's a helpful feature that improves the software. UXPin isn't the sole software that provides the "flat-out copied" features recently implemented in XD and probably weren't the first (tho it wouldn't surprise me because UXPin is awesome.)
Edited
  • reply
  • like

November 13, 2019 at 10:48am
UXPin is not a fan of artboards.
  • reply
  • like

November 14, 2019 at 10:45am
If a feature is a great idea and users love it, a company would be dumb to ignore it. For example, UXPin is supposedly adding artboards down the line. Artboards are integral to XD. UXPin being lazy and contrived now? No, it's a helpful feature that improves the software. UXPin isn't the sole software that provides the "flat-out copied" features recently implemented in XD and probably weren't the first (tho it wouldn't surprise me because UXPin is awesome.)
I think the comparison is drawn with "feature requests being actively ignored" by Adobe, UXPin have added requested features and updates more frequently than any design tool I've used, which tells me that they wouldn't have to look elsewhere for ideas for new features. Instead they seem to place a lot more importance on listening to its userbase to find out what is needed. Adobe's approach seems to be much more like I described: ignore users, add unasked for and intrusive features and anything innovative rolling out seems to be copied from design tools whose developers are listening to their userbases. I don't think there's anything wrong with these companies competing with each other to deliver a good service, it's capitalism, it's good for us as users because it prevents stagnation. My issue is with how they're competing: ignoring their users, hiking up prices and only releasing good updates when their competitors do the "innovative" heavy-lifting for them.
  • reply
  • like
I am not a fan of Adobe XD interface. It does not offer the level of control to the user.
  • reply
  • like
I understand what you're saying, but to be a unique piece of software developers would have to ignore features users always request. Hovers, interactions, iterations, etc. Devs try to create their own system, people complain it would work better if it were like X software. Devs cave and implement them, boom they're copying X software. Damned if you do, damned if you don't.
Also, Adobe is a publicly traded company worth more than $142 Billion. They abide by a different set of rules and are expected to make as much profit as possible. Yes, they're expensive and do corporate things, but they also support over 20+ software titles, including industry leaders. XD probably hasn't been terribly high on their priority list.
like-fill
1
  • reply
  • like